Subscribe to Newsletter

Enter your email and get newsletter from Greg Shapiro
Email:

Parool: “Shapiro Helps Boom Chicago Celebrate 25 years with Eerily Real Fake-Trump”

Date: Saturday, July 21, 2018
Category: Blog, News

HET PAROOL – 16 JULY, 2018 – Mike Peek
BOOM CHICAGO CELEBRATES WITH EERILY REAL FAKE-TRUMP

“Again Shapiro crawled back into Trump’s skin and did a fantastic job. There is no shortage of Trump imitators, but Shapiro goes far beyond imitating a voice or physical gestures. He even creeps into Trump’s head and can, on the basis of a word or question from the audience, expand into a completely realistic tirade. The trick is that you never manage to finish a sentence and just have one thought flow into the next. Before you know it, there’s a beautiful, Trump-worthy word salad. It no longer has any meaning, but it works enormously well for generating laughs. Boom Chicago could make a whole show out of this.”

HET PAROOL – 16 JULY, 2018
[English translation Google / Shapiro]

BOOM CHICAGO CELEBRATES WITH EERILY REAL FAKE-TRUMP 
– Mike Peek

Boom Chicago celebrated its 25th anniversary Saturday with no less than two performances.

The best moment of Boom Chicago’s anniversary evening took place offstage, far beyond the spotlight in Carré. By about 23:30 Seth Meyers had stripped off his necktie and, in a comfortable T-shirt, walked over to two men with whom he worked together at Boom probably in the late nineties. He embraced them, put his head against their shoulders and made a selfie. One could tell the bond is still strong. Friendship that spans time, distance and success.

After he left Boom in 2001, Meyers made a lightning-fast jump to a career at the comedy institute Saturday Night Live, where he eventually became head writer. Since 2014 he has been presenting his own Late Night with Seth Meyers, arguably the best and most relevant American talk show at the moment, both politically and socially.

Strange Aftertaste
Meyers, as the most famous ex-member of Boom Chicago, kicked off the evening with a solo stand-up show, in which he immediately denied the idea that Donald Trump is a blessing for comedy. Yes, you can easily ridicule Trump, but it still feels like you’re profiting from an outbreak of the plague. For Meyers, Trump’s presidency also has a somewhat strange taste. According to some people, Trump decided to make himself eligible for the presidency after the White House Correspondent’s Dinner of 2011, where Meyers (and the then President Obama) made a lot of jokes at the expense of the American businessman. Humor can put things into perspective, but also stir up fire.

Meyers played a solid set in which his private life ultimately played a greater role than politics. He is married to a human rights lawyer and explained very clearly what inconveniences you are running into in such a household. Meyers thinks in comedy. He sits on the couch and suddenly shouts that – from a linguistic point of view – pedophilia is a funny word. For his wife it is mainly a word that you associate with oppression and suffering.

The big anniversary show later in the evening was anything but a sober look back at how it all started. Pep Rosenfeld and Andrew Moskos, together with Saskia Maas the founders of Boom Chicago, only recalled that Americans were still cool in 1993 and that Albert Heijn supermarket remained closed on Sundays. They then gave the stage over to dozens of former cast members who were allowed to practice their art once again.

Wonderful Word Salad
Almost every form of improvisation came along. The difference in quality was huge. Many of the longer scenes died, presumably because these comedians haven’t performed with each other for years. The musical pieces were often very good. Musical theater veteran Michael Diederich provided a phenomenal musical parody. The Dutch contribution was confined to an embarrassing piece by De Lama’s (Ruben van der Meer and Tijl Beckand) and to cameo’s by Jelka van Houten and Arjen Lubach – Lubach who took questions for Greg Shapiro, the man who – in the famous ‘America First – Netherlands Second’ video – imitated the voice of Donald Trump.

And again Shapiro crawled back into Trump’s skin and did a fantastic job. There is no shortage of Trump imitators, but Shapiro goes far beyond imitating a voice or physical gestures. He even creeps into Trump’s head and can, on the basis of a word or question from the audience, expand into a completely realistic tirade. The trick is that you never manage to finish a sentence and just have one thought flow into the next. Before you know it, there’s a beautiful, Trump-worthy word salad. It no longer has any meaning, but it works enormously in generating laughs. Boom Chicago could make a whole show out of this.